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Insights on Beer, Vinegar and Customer Experience

beerI have come to believe that we are all spinning our wheels in our efforts to change until we learn to understand and embrace our irrationality.  I watched anotherDan Ariely talk this weekend and he shared an analogy that really helps illustrate why we are so irrational about understanding our irrationality.  Humans by nature are irrational beings, so how can we become rational about our irrationality?  He speaks about a study where they provide two types of beer and ask the participants for their preference.   One group is told they are tasting one beer with vinegar added and another beer without; in this case the participants all prefer the one without.  Then they offer the same two beers to a second group only this time they don’t share that one has vinegar in it; and in this case the participants prefer the one with vinegar.  Turns out that vinegar enhances the taste of beer but our preconceived notions of what vinegar would do to beer trump how we experience it.  In other words, our preconceptions shape our experiences and trump reality.  Which highlights that we don’t even have a clue when we are being irrational.

So how can companies design products and services that account for what we are unaware of?  And how can we advocate change when we are neurologically wired by our preconceptions that inhibit us from embracing what we really would otherwise prefer.

I think it is fair to say that most companies are finally focusing on Customer Experience as a key imperative.  But they are doing this with little to no regard for how we human beings actually experience products and services.  These days data and rational strategies are typically the drivers behind most Customer Experience initiatives, with high rewards.  But with this approach we are only scratching the surface of the opportunity to maximize the value and returns of our efforts.  If we layer in mechanisms to interrupt or disguise our preconceptions that block us from a positive experience than I believe we can exponentially impact outcomes both for our customers and financial stakeholders.

Ariely gives a powerful example of this in context of social conflict.  An example I see time and again in business is when companies deliver a new message, or create a new product or service that they are certain is of great value for their customer.  Yet it gets received with reluctance, caution or even rejection.  Typically the response to this is to either push harder, re-engineer, or to abandon the change altogether.  When really what is needed is to better understand the preconceived beliefs that are in our way.  To complicate this challenge further, our own personal preconceived beliefs about what our customers needs are may be in our way too.  Bottom line is that we need to invest in a sophisticated understanding of human behaviour.  This awareness needs to begin academically, and once we begin to understand the nuances of it we will see, hear, and experience everything differently.  Only then can we really begin to expand on the rewards of designing meaningful experiences for our customers.

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The Mindfulness Circle

Mindfulness CircleConceptually understanding the Cycle of Self is key to maximizing our potential.  It explains our “why”. Why we believe what we believe, why we think what we think, and why we do what we do.  We can leverage Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle to help illustrate the “why”, “how” and “what” of mindfulness.  Simply put, Sinek’s Golden Circle is based on the principle that great leaders take an inside out approach.  Starting with the “why”, then the “how”, before getting to the “what”. More commonly leaders focus on the “what”, which does not motivate or inspire us to act.  The “what” informs people with rational, logical information but it is the “why” that ignites purpose, emotion and instincts that motivate us to act.

By applying the same inside out approach to ourselves we can mindfully design our life experiences.  Starting with our “self”, then tuning into our “awareness”, before trying to “change” ourselves.  Most of us set goals to change or add habits without understanding why our habits exist.  Few of us examine what false beliefs we have that are keeping us stuck.  Trying to change ourselves without understanding our motivations assumes we are rational and logical, but the fact of the matter is we are not.  We are human first.  That is why most New Years resolutions fail, along with all the other attempts we make to start or stop our habits.

My last post examined “self”.  But how do we move beyond conceptually understanding the significant of self?  We do this through “awareness”.  Awareness is tricky business.  It has cyclical complexities similar to the Self Cycle.  It takes discipline to become and remain aware and it takes kindness to ourselves to own ourselves with empathy and without judgement.  And we need to accept ourselves as we are, unconditionally, with the discipline to pay attention to when we act on our false beliefs.  And when we do, we must be kind to ourselves.  Meditation, yoga, golf, walking; essentially any activity that brings us closer to nature and our spirit will help us mindfully navigate through awareness.

Then as we become aware of the parts of self that do not serve us, the parts that get in the way of what we want, we can begin to explore how to create meaningful change in our life.  Our “self” + “awareness” will inspire our intent.  And our intent will take lots of practice.  Quite frankly we will fail (many times) before we succeed.  Which is why we need to reward ourselves each every time we succeed.  This will reinforce the value of our new habit(s). We must keep reminding ourselves or our intent, with discipline, kindness and acceptance, trusting our beliefs and thoughts will design the experiences we desire.

This journey will feel a lot like taming a wild horse.  We need to have patience with the parts of ourselves that like to run free, fast and wild.  But we will also need focus and concentration to  have the discipline to resist distractions that are not aligned with our beliefs and intentions.  This is a life long journey, not a destination.

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More quests needed – Celebrating 45 years since the moon Landing

More quests needed – Celebrating 45 years since the moon Landing

Exactly 45 years ago today, Neil Armstrong walked on the moon achieving one of humankind’s greatest quests. With his words “One small leap for man, one giant leap for mankind” Armstrong captured the essence of a quest – endeavours taken by an individual or group of individuals to enhance and further the lives of others.

The world is in need of a many bold new quests. We need to recapture the spirit and adventure. If individuals and organisations do not step up the 21st century has the potential to be our last. By 2030 an individual using a bio-pathogen will have the capability to end it all. There are deep pressing issues that need organisational and leadership refocus.

Regulators in the US have imposed fines of over $35 billion this year and there is more fines to come. $7 billion of this was a fine imposed on Citigroup for knowingly selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Bad business does not pay. Quests do. Geoff Immelt, the CEO of GE is on a quest to improve the world by 1%. IBM is on a quest to create a smarter planet. ITER, a global organisation with the backing of 35 countries, is on a quest to create an energy source that uses an element in seawater called deuterium to power our planet for the next 100,000 years. Deuterium has a natural abundance in the Earth’s oceans, one cubic kilometre of the ocean is vested with more potential fusion energy—hot or cold—than that of all known oil reserves in the world.  The process will produce zero pollutants and not contribute to global warming.

ITER’s funding is $14 billion, politicians argue this cost is too high. What is their quest? The US approved funding of Lockheed Martin’s new F35 fighter jet is $400 billion. Fighter jet versus the quest to power the planet – with an abundant, eco-friendly energy, why is there even a debate?

The dream to go to the moon is one of our greatest quests, it inspired a nation to achieve the unthinkable within a decade. The challenges facing our world are graver than the cold war that inspired the space race. It is also full of countless opportunities – Never before have we stood at such a golden era of change, unprecedented change. The world needs leaders who refocus their mindset (and key stakeholders) on what matters most for communities and society. Embrace a new era of exploring the uncharted – Leaders have been told: “the world is flat!” and “there be dragons here” Be brave sail over the edge. Discover a new world of riches.

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The Self Cycle

July 16, 2014 dawna Change, Leadership, Strategy No Comments

self cycleI like taking notice of the patterns of my thoughts.  It’s not coincidence that my thoughts draw me towards experiences that reflect my thoughts.  Which also means that what I think about , both consciously and subconsciously, shape my experiences.  So why then would I ever entertain thoughts of fear and insecurity knowing that I would be manifesting experiences to reflect my worries? To answer this we need to first explore what shapes our thoughts.  Our thoughts are a  reflection of our beliefs and each and every one of us have numerous false beliefs that can sabotage our mindset.  Our false beliefs usually reveal themselves through our biases and irrational choices.   And our beliefs are mostly shaped by our life stories which in turn develop from the beliefs we form from our previous experiences… which are formed by our thoughts, which are formed by our beliefs.  The cyclical nature of this is what forms our patterns of thought. It’s a challenging cycle to deconstruct and change.  If we focus on awareness of our beliefs and ensuring they are aligned with truth and our core values then we can begin to re-architect our thoughts, including our thoughts about our past experiences.

Patterns of thoughts are reaffirming which then strengthens their hold on us.  This reoccurrence becomes our comfort zone, even if it is a negative pattern, the familiarity of it feels comfortable.  This is the nature of being human.  The challenge is to both embrace being human and to develop the self awareness to grow beyond the limitations of our patterns.  A big part of this is becoming comfortable with the uncomfortable by challenging and mindfully choosing our beliefs.  I would like to propose that there is nothing more important than developing our self awareness.  The fact of the matter is that the only thing in the way of what we want in life is ourselves.

The affects of this are pervasive.  The most challenging pattern I see with every company and leader I work with is the lack of recognition that the biggest thing in their way is themselves.  Companies are made up of humans and it is our collective beliefs, thoughts and experiences that shape our ability to prosper.  Smart leaders recognize this and invest in self awareness for themselves and their associates.  There is no more powerful competitive advantage than self awareness.  I dream of a world where kids are explicitly taught about self awareness both at home and at school.  A world where companies explicitly invest in developing the self awareness of their leaders and associates.  And my dream is more attainable that you might think.  You do not need to be a leader to be a part of making this happen, you just need to begin to invest in your own self awareness and encourage others to do the same, it really is that simple.

“Be the change you want to see in the world” Gandhi

 

 

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Peugeot unveils a new car that runs on air.

Peugeot unveils a new car that runs on air.

We are living during a era of great technological innovation. At TomorrowToday we love technology that has the ability to disrupt not only products but entire industries, even countries. Peugeot Citroën  appears to be doing just that . The car manufacturer has unveiled a new hybrid drivetrain that uses compressed air instead of electricity to provide a secondary source of propulsion. They call this innovation Hybrid Air and it’s a technology they claim will be available in their compact models (Citroën C3 or a Peugeot 208) by 2016 for a price of £16,000. The company claims that the car using a hybrid system emits as little as 69g/km of CO2 i.e. 2.9l / 100km. Peugeot aims to reduce this to 2l/100km by 2020 

 An innovative full-hybrid gasoline solution. An important step towards the 2l/100 km car by 2020 

The car travels on compressed air propelling it to speeds of 43mph where after the petrol or diesel system kicks in. 60-80% of journeys can therefore be completed, in an urban city environment, using just air!

A car that runs on compressed air has the potential to not only disrupt the motor industry, but the massive oil industry too. This is great news for environmentalist, but not for those who invest in the future of fossil fuel. Understanding the impact of this disruption needs to be a boardroom topic for energy companies. TomorrowToday is partnering with London Business School and our facilitators are working on a leadership programme for Kuwait Petroleum Company. We’ve learnt that 80% of the Kuwaiti economy is depedent on the oil industry. What happens when an abundant, cheap and pollution free source of propulsion replaces or reduces significantly the demand for their liquid gold? It’s a question we will put to them at the next session with KPC senior leaders in Spetember. The answers should be interesting.

 

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Cut away view of the hybrid air compression propulsion system

 

Ray Massey became the first UK journalist to test drive the new car in Paris. Here is an excerpt on his driving experience:

Driving feels a little different to a conventional automatic car. It’s nimble. A visual display on the dashboard screen tells you when you are in zero pollution or petrol mode. It chugs happily along in town running only on air. It certainly didn’t run out of puff and giving the accelerator a quick burst — vital on Parisian roads to keep you out of trouble — meant the combined force of the 82bhp petrol engine and the 40bhp air motor kicked in together to put wind in its sails.

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Ray Massey test driving Hybrid Air

You can read his full review of the car at the Daily Mail

 

 

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The Future of theft…okay bye bye now.

The Future of theft…okay bye bye now.

According to the website Stolen Bike Statistics over 500,000 bikes were stolen in the UK over the past five years. This figure is also understated. According to John Moss who compiled these stat  “It is largely accepted that only 1 in 5 bike thefts are reported to the police, therefore the bike thefts figures can be considered 5 times higher than reported.” 

These numbers are about to plummet. Designers at Jawbone and Boeing have developed a solar powered bicycle lock, called Skylock, that works via Bluetooth connectivity to your phone – and the phones of friends you select. One hour of sunshine provides a weeks power and should your bike be noticably jarred Skylock will emmediately send you an alert to your smartphone. The lock uses military grade material giving you enough time to get to your bike before it’s nicked. And, as if that’s not enough should you get doored by a carelss driver or loose it on a rain-slicked road, Skylock will notify friends and family so they can come to your aid. The best thing of all is the price, at around £90 for a lock it compares very favourably with traditional high-end locks!

Two things for the future.

  1. Skylock is benefting from the fast growing shareconmy. Bikes are one of our most under-utilised assets, by allowing friends easy and secure access to your bike you can park it and let approved people share your ride. Skylock allows for instant ride sharing
  2. By linking your bike lock to the Internet of Things, bike theft fast become a thing of the past. We are entering a world were our assets will tell us when dubious people are tinkering with them. They will be able to alert authorities. In the future products like Skylock will make theft a pointless pastime!

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The greatest challenge facing the future of business, requires your attention now.

The greatest challenge facing the future of business, requires your attention now.

Peter Menzel, is an award winning photographer, takes photographs of people posing next to their possessions taken out of their home and piled high on the pavements. The pictures paint a vividly clear picture – we live in a Material World, also the name of his book. You do not need to look at the pictures for long before it becomes clear that around the world, the industrial system has been immensely successful. Our parent’s parents bought into the system, our parents bought into the system and so have we because it has given or promised to give us a lot of cheap stuff. But here is the catch; whilst capitalism has served us enormously well – it has helped reduce property, improved standards of living around the globe, there are a number of perversions and the system  come at an enormous cost: unsustainable levels of public and private debt, excessive consumerism, and, way, too many people who are left behind. As Paul Poleman explains in a recent Mckinsey article: “Any system that prevents large numbers of people from fully participating or excludes them altogether will ultimately be rejected. And that’s what you see happening. People are asking, “What are we doing here?”

The facts of the situation are alarming:

  • we currently use is 1.5 times the world’s resource capacity.
  • Over a billion people still go to bed hungry.
  • The richest 85 people have the same wealth as the bottom 3.5 billion.

None of this is sustainable. If the post industrial capitalist system does not change itself it will be changed through the power of protest. Just because we are living in the 21st Century does not mean that the power of protest will not result in another “French Revolution.” As digitisation and the Internet give consumers enormous abilities to connect and aggregate their voices,  we will see the impact of power being dispersed and the pressure in the system will rise while wealth remains concentrated. Further development and population growth will put a lot more pressure on our planet and more and more people will ask why so few do so well when so many suffer. We are sitting on a powder keg of disruption like no other ever seen in the history of our planet.

Addressing the perversions of capitalism needs to become a strategic priority for all companies. Virginia Rometty, the Chairman of IBM cucintley puts it in her message to shareholders “How will we engage with an emerging global culture, defined not by age or geography, but by people determined to change the practices of business and society?”

I believe this is the single biggest threat facing the world of business today. By 2035, a single person, through a bio-pathegen will have the ability to end it all. But that should not be the motivating principle to find a solution. Capitalism on the whole is a very good system, but it can be made better and in doing so business can make a lot of money and society can prosper. So, I’m on a quest, to change the future of capitalism. It’s a big quest, and ideological one but it is a quest worth fighting for. Let me make this clear, I am a capitalist, it is a system I believe in, but…and this is a big BUT, capitalism needs to change if it is to be the relevant economic system propelling economic growth and prosperity into the future. I fear for society if it does not. But there is good news on the horizon because increasingly a number of hard nose business leaders and successful businesses are positioning themselves for the changes that will redefine capitalism as we know it. We are entering an exciting time and whilst there will be naysayers and people who want to protect the current status-quo I’m optimistic that business leaders will find solutions. Want proof? Here’s a starter-for-ten. Unilever chief executive Paul Polman explains why capitalism must evolve, his company’s efforts to change, and how business leaders are critical to solving intractable problems.

 

 

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Three ways to deal with failure, by Seth Godin

April 10, 2014 Graeme Codrington Change, Innovation, Leadership, Personal Development No Comments
Three ways to deal with failure, by Seth Godin

Seth Godin is one of my favourite authors and business thinkers. I find his daily blog inspirational and insightful.

Here’s one from a while ago that has really stuck with me. I think Seth is spot on with this insight, and it could really help you to deal with failure and think about your corporate culture.

Accuracy, resilience and denial


… three ways to deal with the future.

Accuracy is the most rewarding way to deal with what will happen tomorrow–if you predict correctly. Accuracy rewards those that put all their bets on one possible outcome. The thing is, accuracy requires either a significant investment of time and money, or inside information (or luck, but that’s a different game entirely). Without a reason to believe that you’ve got better information than everyone else, it’s hard to see how you can be confident that this is a smart bet.

Resilience is the best strategy for those realistic enough to admit that they can’t predict the future with more accuracy than others. Resilience isn’t a bet on one outcome, instead, it’s an investment across a range of possible outcomes, a way to ensure that regardless of what actually occurs (within the range), you’ll do fine.

And denial, of course, is the strategy of assuming that the future will be just like today.

… Continue Reading

What the UK storms can teach leaders about gaining advantage from disruptive forces

What the UK storms can teach leaders about gaining advantage from disruptive forces

We are living in unprecedented times. The storms lashing the UK coast are the worst in living memory and the costs to the economy are in the region of £14b and growing as the weatherman reports two additional storms approaching. The calamitous disruption to business, homes and lives is  painful to see. Out of the chaos however, there are several lessons business leaders can benefit from. The tides of change are lashing the shorelines of businesses around the world (excuse the pun). Disruptive forces can now cripple a business overnight and have devastating and lasting effect. The storms hitting the UK this year whilst not predictable in magnitude, were identifiable as a growing trend. A warming planet has resulted in a wetter, warmer climate in the UK for the past decade. I wonder how many businesses that have been disrupted by the flooding of rail and road networks had plans in place before hand of how to not only deal with these disruptions, but to gain advantage over their competitors. We don’t have the figures to this question, but we can’t imagine many.  

But the signs have been there for the past few years. If you were a business observing and reading the weak signals you would’ve known to plan for a disruption of this nature. We work with business leaders around the world helping them to identify, understand and build competitive advantage out of disruptive forces. Using our TIDES of Change model we get companies and leaders to think about the questions they should be asking on disruptive forces  but are not. T-I-D-E-S stands for Technology, Institutional change, Demographics, Environment & Ethics and Shifting social values. There are other disruptive forces but our research from our Strategic Insights and Futures Lab shows that they are the five biggest forces of disruption.

Environment and Ethics are the most powerful of the five disruptive forces we track and their impact has the potential to disrupt businesses immediately. Yet we often find environment and ethics is the area of least focus by leaders. Take the storm, caused by changes in the global environment. The potency is massive and damage is immediate are you prepared and how can you turn the disruption into an advantage? During the devastating Cumbrian floods of 2009 the bridge in Workington over the river Derwent was swept away. The community in the Seaton and Northside areas of Workington faced a detour of up to 40 miles to just buy basic commodities. Tesco,  a leading food retailer, sprung into action. They had an emergency solution at hand. Advanced planning with Yorkon, a manufacturing company, allowed Tesco to spring into action and within  a week of the bridge being washed away a tempory store had been erectet to help ease some of the problems facing the flood-hit community. You can watch a video of this story on Youtube.

Because of advanced planning and quick action Tesco was able to turn the disruption into an advantage and build massive goodwill with the community. Out of every disruption there are opportunities to do good for society, build goodwill and competitive advantage. Are you having the right conversations about disruptive forces in your business?

Are you asking the right questions and developing the strategies to counter and leverage disruption? If you are not take the opportunity to talk to us we’d love to show you what we know and share our insights.

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The four horsemen of mediocrity, by Seth Godin

January 30, 2014 Graeme Codrington Change, Leadership, Organisational Development, The workplace No Comments
The four horsemen of mediocrity, by Seth Godin

Seth Godin’s blog today is superb. He is identified four key reasons that employees are disengaged, that productivity is declining or stagnant, and that companies struggle to innovate and develop.

The four horsemen of mediocrity

by Seth Godin

Deniability–”They decided, created, commanded or blocked. Not my fault.”

Helplessness–”My boss won’t let me.”

Contempt–”They don’t pay me enough to put up with the likes of these customers.”

Fear–”It’s good enough, it’s not worth the risk, people will talk, this might not work…”

The industrial age brought compliance and compliance brought fear and fear brought us mediocrity.

The good news about fear is that once you see it, feel it and dance with it, you have a huge opportunity, the chance to make it better.

Source: Seth Godin

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How did things ever get so far?… It was so unfortunate, so unnecessary

November 28, 2013 Dil Sidhu Change, Connection Economy, Leadership No Comments
How did things ever get so far?… It was so unfortunate, so unnecessary

This post is submitted by TomorrowToday associate Dil Sidhu, Chief External Officer at Manchester Business School

These were the words spoken by the fictional crime family patriarch Don Corleone in the movie ‘The Godfather’ in reference to actions and counteractions between  crime families.  The same comments are also just as applicable to the revelations that continue to surface from corporate organisations in reference to their board governance and the damaging decisions taken by individuals.

In the UK the financial news is currently focused on the difficulties faced by the Co-Operative Bank,  and Co-Operative Group, about allegations around behaviours of senior board leadership. As a self-styled ‘Ethical Bank’ the Co-Operative was considered the bastion of doing things differently and better than the financial institutions that were part of the cause of the 2008 melt-down or one of the many victims of the ensuing domino effect that followed.

Since that time there have been numerous in investigations, parliamentary committees, congressional hearings and financial re-regulation.  However, while the rules and regulations have been tightened there has been scant attention paid to the leadership styles of those that were in the driver’s seat when the financial institutions hit the wall.

New regulations with the same leadership issues will not necessarily be enough to avoid future similar scenarios unfolding. The leadership styles, personal values and appreciation of leading in times of ambiguity should also form part of the outcomes from the multitude of new governance and financial regulatory guidelines.

I recently spent two-days learning about what it means to be an ‘Effective Non-Executive Director’ operating with a corporate board.  The programme was great at reviewing the history of corporate governance, the multiple regulations and operating guidelines that have been established and also the dynamics that are present in a board room team.  However, all the rules and regulations in the world will not make much difference, as the on-going press stories about individual lapses in judgement and leadership suggest, if the area of personal leadership style and values are not included in the dialogue.

One way to determine how senior leaders make decisions is to gauge their ability to operate in an environment of ambiguity and uncertainty.  This is where I would argue our values-based thinking comes to the forefront instead of what any corporate rules and regulations list.  Organisations are made up of people first and operating principles and guidelines second. The people need to be ‘road-tested’ on their ability to make clear decisions based on the available facts.  The quality of discussions is a clear indicator of making better decisions as is the ability to create a team that is diverse.  Diversity in thought and perspective rather than diversity defined as gender, ethnicity or other measures exlusively.

If the same people with the same leadership behaviours are operating at senior levels – no amount of regulatory framework or good governing practice guidelines will be enough to avert further corporate headlines and business crashes.

The unfolding of the situation at the Co-Operative Bank is testament to the need to change leadership operating guidelines in tandem with surfacing and enhancing personal behaviours and values.

 

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Seven steps to creating a Vibrant, Unreal, Crazy and Awesome world

Seven steps to creating a Vibrant, Unreal, Crazy and Awesome world

The acronym VUCA comes from military vocabulary and stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous situation. Originating in the late 1990′s the term has infiltrated corporate and government organisations used primarily to generate emerging ideas and solutions in strategic planning.

However, whilst this sounds great for consultants selling fear-mongering it does not encapsulate the golden era of change that we live in. Of course there is volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. That’s life! But we actually live in an exciting, vibrant and incredible time of change. Leaders have never been more privileged than what they are today and they have a clean sheet of paper to re-imagine every aspect of business. With privilege comes responsibility too. Failure to change means loss of shareholder confidence, loss of position, loss of customers, loss of jobs etc.

The  VUCA interpretation misses the point, it generates a concentration of developing strategies aimed at reducing the volatility and getting back to normality. When rather  the waves of change need to be ridden and seen as an adventure in the quest to create a vibrant, unreal, crazy and awesome world.  This different take on the word VUCA is one I heard Global CEO of Saatchi and Saatchi Kevin Roberts talk about. It’s a brilliant spin on the acronym and changes the strategic mindset to one that seeks new opportunities and challenges established paradigms.

The next time you are in a strategy session examining the opportunities and threats, explore how your organisation can contribute to and benefit from a VIBRANT, UNREAL, CRAZY and AWESOME world. This is the VUCA world leaders should focus on creating.

Below is a speech Kevin Roberts gave on the term VUCA and how the word can be used to think about how we create a better world for everyone

… Continue Reading

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Primary Blog contributors

The main contributors to this blog are:

Dr Graeme Codrington, co-founder of TomorrowToday, author, speaker and expert on the changing world of work
Dean van Leeuwen, co-founder and CEO of TomorrowToday UK & Europe, speaker, consultant and Chief Intellectual Adventurer
Keith Coats, co-founder of TomorrowToday South Africa, leadership development guru, speaker and author
Professor Nick Barker, director of the Asia Pacific Leadership Program at the East-West Center in Hawaii, leadership development expert
Markus Kramer, marketing director for Aston Martin and brand building expert
Keith Holdt, Visionary Enabler of business growth and change, currently works for LDC as an investment executive.
Dil Sidhu, Chief External Officer, Manchester Business School; Executive education specialist.
Dawna MacLean, expert on fostering meaningful change and creating authentic experiences through transparent and trusted partnerships.

Click here for a full list of contributors


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